The Latest

Apr 16, 2014 / 1,257 notes

spaceplasma:

Ganymede and Callisto are similar in size and are made of a similar mixture of ice and rock, but data from the Galileo and Voyager spacecraft show that they look different at the surface and on the inside. Just like Earth and Venus, Ganymede and Callisto are twins, and understanding how they were born the same and grew up to be so different is of tremendous interest to planetary scientists.

Ganymede and Callisto’s evolutionary paths diverged about 3.8 billion years ago during the Late Heavy Bombardment, the phase in lunar history dominated by large impact events. Impacts during this period melted Ganymede so thoroughly and deeply that the heat could not be quickly removed. All of Ganymede’s rock sank to its center the same way that all the chocolate chips sink to the bottom of a melted carton of ice cream. Callisto received fewer impacts at lower velocities and avoided complete melting. Ganymede is closer to Jupiter and therefore is hit by twice as many icy impactors as Callisto, and the impactors hitting Ganymede have a higher average velocity.

Image Credit: NOAA/GSD

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

Apr 13, 2014 / 36 notes

(via wolffeeder)

Apr 13, 2014 / 215,932 notes

the-onion-slut:

I used to be a straight A student

Now I’m not even straight

(via captjackqueerness)

theromanceofthetelescope:


Numbers stations are mysterious shortwave radio channels of indiscernible origin that exist in countries all across the world and have been reported since World War 1. They are identifiable by the unusual contents of their broadcasts: seemingly random sequences of numbers, words, letters, tunes, and Morse code, usually spoken by artificially generated voices of women and children. 
The most common theory regarding the purpose of these bizarre stations is that they’re used by governments the world over to secretly transmit encrypted commands and messages to spies. That said, even though numbers stations have been discovered all over the globe and in any number of different languages, no government has ever officially acknowledged their existence. While the espionage theory is a logical one, with no official confirmation of their purpose the jury is still out.
One particularly odd station, UVB-76, has existed since the late 1970s and has broadcast a simple, repetitive buzzing tone 24 hours a day ever since. On very rare occasions, however, listeners have reported a Russian voice interrupting the buzz to read out sequences of numbers and words, always in a consistent format — this happened once in 1997, once in 2002, once in 2006, 56 times in 2010, and 14 in 2011. As with all numbers stations, its true purpose is and will probably remain unknown, but the increase in frequency of whatever it’s doing is certainly odd.
You can listen to well over 100 recordings of numbers stations for free on archive.org but be forewarned that they’re all kind of, well, eerie. They feel like something you shouldn’t be listening to, which stands to reason since apparently you’re not supposed to know they exist.

you don’t have to be on drugs to want to listen to these, but trust me, it doesn’t hurt ;-)
Apr 13, 2014 / 45,742 notes

theromanceofthetelescope:

Numbers stations are mysterious shortwave radio channels of indiscernible origin that exist in countries all across the world and have been reported since World War 1. They are identifiable by the unusual contents of their broadcasts: seemingly random sequences of numbers, words, letters, tunes, and Morse code, usually spoken by artificially generated voices of women and children.

The most common theory regarding the purpose of these bizarre stations is that they’re used by governments the world over to secretly transmit encrypted commands and messages to spies. That said, even though numbers stations have been discovered all over the globe and in any number of different languages, no government has ever officially acknowledged their existence. While the espionage theory is a logical one, with no official confirmation of their purpose the jury is still out.

One particularly odd station, UVB-76, has existed since the late 1970s and has broadcast a simple, repetitive buzzing tone 24 hours a day ever since. On very rare occasions, however, listeners have reported a Russian voice interrupting the buzz to read out sequences of numbers and words, always in a consistent format — this happened once in 1997, once in 2002, once in 2006, 56 times in 2010, and 14 in 2011. As with all numbers stations, its true purpose is and will probably remain unknown, but the increase in frequency of whatever it’s doing is certainly odd.

You can listen to well over 100 recordings of numbers stations for free on archive.org but be forewarned that they’re all kind of, well, eerie. They feel like something you shouldn’t be listening to, which stands to reason since apparently you’re not supposed to know they exist.

you don’t have to be on drugs to want to listen to these, but trust me, it doesn’t hurt ;-)

4gifs:

Baby elephant confused by woman’s tiny nose.  [video]
Apr 13, 2014 / 6,126 notes

4gifs:

Baby elephant confused by woman’s tiny nose.  [video]

(via hightensions)

rememberyouaredreaming:

Remember You Are Dreaming
Apr 10, 2014 / 351 notes
Caught an action shot of one of my grandmother’s pals
Apr 8, 2014 / 9 notes

Caught an action shot of one of my grandmother’s pals

Apr 1, 2014 / 3 notes
Mar 21, 2014 / 129,130 notes
Mar 21, 2014 / 175,833 notes

(via lunostar)

baapi-makwa:

isthisanagate

Thanks baapi-makwaLove you
Mar 17, 2014 / 11 notes

baapi-makwa:

isthisanagate

Thanks baapi-makwa
Love you

Road trip w my brother. No country in my phone to play over the cars stereo. So I told him he can DL Dierks Bentley. I would download dierks any day.
Mar 16, 2014 / 1 note

Road trip w my brother. No country in my phone to play over the cars stereo. So I told him he can DL Dierks Bentley. I would download dierks any day.

Mar 16, 2014 / 2 notes

Confession.

I just gave my brothers dog people food. What a rush. He would kill me if he knew